Publications

Our academic, peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters.

 
 
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INFORMATICS FOR THE MODERN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

CRITICAL CARE NURSING QUARTERLY

DIANA C. ANDERSON; ASHLEY A. JACKSON; NEIL A. HALPERN

JANUARY/MARCH, 2018

Abstract

Advanced informatics systems can help improve health care delivery and the environment of care for critically ill patients. However, identifying, testing, and deploying advanced informatics systems can be quite challenging. These processes often require involvement from a collaborative group of health care professionals of varied disciplines with knowledge of the complexities related to designing the modern and “smart” intensive care unit (ICU). In this article, we explore the connectivity environment within the ICU, middleware technologies to address a host of patient care initiatives, and the core informatics concepts necessary for both the design and implementation of advanced informatics systems.

 
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book chapter: INTENSIVE CARE UNIT DESIGN: CURRENT STANDARDS AND FUTURE TRENDS

CHAPTER AUTHORS: DIANA C. ANDERSON; NEIL A. HALPERN

BOOK TITLE: IRWIN AND RIPPE'S INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, 8E

WOLTERS KLUWER, 2017

Hospital-based intensivist administrators at some point in their careers may be asked to participate in designing new or renovating existing ICUs. For simplicity of presentation we have divided this chapter into five sections; the ICU design process, the ICU patient room, central clinical, visitor and staff support and administrative areas, ICU informatics, and future trends. While we classify these areas separately, they are indeed heavily interrelated.

Healthcare and design are actually very complex processes that must accommodate and address continuously evolving guidelines and regulatory standards. Several core principles should guide ICU-specific design.

 
 
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SIMULATING CIRCADIAN LIGHT: MULTI-DIMENSIONAL ILLUMINANCE ANALYSIS

PROCEEDINGS OF THE 15TH IBPSA CONFERENCE, SAN FRANCISCO

PHILLIP H. EWING; JOHN HAYMAKER; EVE A. EDELSTEIN

AUGUST, 2017

Phillip H. Ewing1, John Haymaker2, Eve A. Edelstein1;3;4

Technologies are emerging that can reveal the reactions of mind and body to specific features of the design environment. This paper reviews a section of these innovations, which can provide the means to conduct pre-design evaluations.

“As healthcare design increasingly incorporates sustainable-design guidelines, we can apply the evidence derived to address human needs that go beyond reduction of noxious and toxic exposures. Architectural, technical and medical knowledge can, in this manner, accelerate such best practice to enhance human experience, performance and health itself. These applications of new technologies sit at the interface between neuroscience and architecture, and enables the provision of more rigorous data for research-based design. The ultimate goal is to support the design of healthy places for all: the healthy, the infirm, the gifted, and those with special needs, and to promote and enhance health and wellbeing across all peoples.”

 
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RESEARCH-BASED DESIGN: NEW APPROACHES TO THE CREATION OF HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS

DESIGN AND HEALTH SCIENTIFIC REVIEW

EVE A. EDELSTEIN, Ph.D

OCTOBER, 2013

Technologies are emerging that can reveal the reactions of mind and body to specific features of the design environment. This paper reviews a section of these innovations, which can provide the means to conduct pre-design evaluations.

“As healthcare design increasingly incorporates sustainable-design guidelines, we can apply the evidence derived to address human needs that go beyond reduction of noxious and toxic exposures. Architectural, technical and medical knowledge can, in this manner, accelerate such best practice to enhance human experience, performance and health itself. These applications of new technologies sit at the interface between neuroscience and architecture, and enables the provision of more rigorous data for research-based design. The ultimate goal is to support the design of healthy places for all: the healthy, the infirm, the gifted, and those with special needs, and to promote and enhance health and wellbeing across all peoples.”

 
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WIRELESS PSYCHOLOGICAL MONITORING AND OCULAR TRACKING: 3D CALIBRATION IN A FULLY-IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENT

ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY (EMBC), 2010 ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE 

LELIN ZHANG; YU MIKE CHI; EVE EDELSTEIN; JURGEN SCHULZE; KLAUS GRAMANN; ALVARO VELASQUEZ; GERT CAUWENBERGHS; EDUARDO MACAGNO

11 NOVEMBER, 2010

Abstract

Wireless physiological/neurological monitoring in virtual reality (VR) offers a unique opportunity for unobtrusively quantifying human responses to precisely controlled and readily modulated VR representations of health care environments. Here we present such a wireless, light-weight head-mounted system for measuring electrooculogram (EOG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity in human subjects interacting with and navigating in the Calit2 StarCAVE, a five-sided immersive 3-D visualization VR environment. The system can be easily expanded to include other measurements, such as cardiac activity and galvanic skin responses. We demonstrate the capacity of the system to track focus of gaze in 3-D and report a novel calibration procedure for estimating eye movements from responses to the presentation of a set of dynamic visual cues in the StarCAVE. We discuss cyber and clinical applications that include a 3-D cursor for visual navigation in VR interactive environments, and the monitoring of neurological and ocular dysfunction in vision/attention disorders.

 
  Concord lighting in the chapel at St Lukes Hospital, London: The influence of light on health is relevant to all architectural environments

Concord lighting in the chapel at St Lukes Hospital, London: The influence of light on health is relevant to all architectural environments

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THE EFFECTS OF COLOUR AND LIGHT: TRANS-DISCIPLINARY RESEARCH RESULTS

DESIGN AND HEALTH SCIENTIFIC REVIEW

EVE A. EDELSTEIN, Ph.D; STEVEN DOCTORS; ROBERT BRANDT; BARBARA DENTON; GALEN CRANZ, Ph.D; ROBERT MANGEL, Ph.D; W. MIKE MARTIN, Ph.D; GORDON H. CHONG

APRIL, 2008

A Latrobe Fellowship research team explores the value of a collaborative approach to evidence-based design through a pilot study of the effect of colour and lighting on patient well-being.

“The College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded the 2005-2007 Latrobe Fellowship to a consortium formed by Chong Partners Architecture, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and the University of California, Berkeley, in order to further research of relevance to architecture within healthcare settings.

The premise of the research was to investigate the practice of evidence-based design (EBD), a term used by many designers, despite the lack of research about the human response to design that can be used to inform design decisions.”